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Question:

How do fighters break ice, cement and wood blocks without breaking their hands, arms, legs and feet?

How do fighters break ice, cement and wood blocks without breaking their hands, arms, legs and feet?

Answer:

strength of mind. cement, when hit correctly can break like a twig but it requires perfect breathing, a strong hand and a psychotic mind. u have to be completly nuts to try and break cement. breaking is is possible but......highly unlikely to happen. it would have to be a foot not a hand to break it. and i could break 10 boards if they each have a cm between each one. its about using the force of the first board to bread the others. so if your smart and good enough ur really only breaking half of them.. the pressure and weight is going to break the rest of them.
May 11, 2017
Just like up said conditioning most old school martial artists used to punch wood,and kick trees to condition their hands and shins/feet they do this for many years and build a tolerance to doing it which prevents injury like punching the corner of a boxing ring the metal just punching 1000 times each day will build your knuckles and prevent the wrist from snapping and teach you not to bend wrist.Hope this helps you
May 11, 2017
With conditioning. If you expose your body to pressure over and over again for the next 10 years your body will do one of two things. It will get damaged or it will adapt to deal with the pressure. Put to much pressure on your body and it will get damaged....Maybe destroyed. Put a small amount of pressure on your body and it will adapt to deal with that pressure. Once it has adapted you can increase the pressure and your body will adapt again. Someday it will be able to handle the pressure that would of destroyed it The most important sentence fragment in the world when you want to accomplish something hard and physical is one step at a time
May 11, 2017
Training, conditioning, practice, perseverance and, did I say training?
May 11, 2017

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