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Question:

making holes is iron and steel?

Can i make holes in iron and steel with somekind of drill bit. All i have is metal drill bits. Mabey like 68 of them but i dont know wich one to use and if they will penetrate.

Answer:

That's what drill bits are made for. Those for steel and iron will usually be made of high speed steel. What is important, is the sharpening, and of course, the overall condition of the drill bit. If you need to drill a larger hole, it is helpful to drill a small hole first (pilot drilling), then open it out to size. Never use drill bits you intend to drill iron or steel with to drill such as timber! It will ruin them for steel working.
Sep 27, 2017
It really depends. If you are drilling iron, I assume you are talking about cast irons and there are many different types, some are easier to drill (and machine) than others. For steels, there are many many different types of steels which can have a huge range of physical properties. In fact, your drill bits are almost certainly made of some type of steel alloy. If your drill bit has the same hardness as the steel you are trying to drill, it will be difficult to drill. If the steel is harder than the drill bit, you won't make a hole, you'll just break your drill bit into smaller pieces. There are drill bits that use carbide inserts or diamond composite inserts and these will drill through steel. You can do a quick check. Take a drill bit and, just by hand, see if it scratches the steel. If it does, then the drill bit is harder than the steel and you can probably drill a hole. If you have trouble drilling holes, consult a machinist. There are many factors which influence how well you can drill holes including use of cutting oils/lubricants, cutting speed, pressure, rake angle, etc.
Sep 27, 2017
Drills are used to make holes in steel all the time.
Sep 27, 2017
If a drill bit will not do the job, you will have to go to something like EDM. But that is a lot of trouble, ask a machinist first.
Sep 27, 2017

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