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Question:

Is Red, Green and Blue the only monochromatic light there is? By monochromatic light, I mean they are not a?

Is Red, Green and Blue the only monochromatic light there is? By monochromatic light, I mean they are not a?

Answer:

From a physics perspective, no. The frequency of light can take on any wavelength in the electromagnetic spectrum. This means visible light can a have a color all the way from the far red to the far violet. You can have monochromatic light of any color. Our eye, or actually our brain's interpretation of our vision, is a curious thing. Our eyes have receptors (cone cells) which are sensitive for visible light. When we observe light, we perceive a certain color. The light doesn't actually have a color, colors are purely our imagination, created in the brain. When we see a superposition of light with multiple wavelengths, our brain compensates by perceiving a different color. This effect is well studied, and is the basis of Color Theory. In Color Theory, red, green and blue are the 3 primary colors. With superposition of monochromatic light of these colors, you can make the brain perceive any other color. This does not mean there does not exist physical monochromatic light of that wavelength. There are exceptions though, some colors which our brain can perceive as the superposition of other colors, do not have a corresponding wavelength. These so called extra-spectral colors are pure imaginary constructs of our brain. One example is Magenta, the color resulting from a superposition of red and blue light. There exists no monochromatic light of any wavelength which is perceived as this color, it is only perceived when red and blue light are combined.
Monochromatic light is light of a single frequency. It can be any frequency, hence any color. Red, green and blue correspond to the ranges of frequencies the cones in our eyes are sensitive to. The other colors we perceive are created by our brains based on the mixture of red, green and blue our eyes receive. The three different types of cone are each sensitive to a range of frequencies, not a single frequency, so we don't really see monochromatic light as such.
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