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Rock Salt, why do people use it and for what?

Rock Salt, why do people use it and for what?

Answer:

Carbonates (calcite and dolomite) make water hard because they are insoluble. Water softeners use zeolites (low-grade metamorphic minerals) to facilitate a chemical reaction that converts (calcium) carbonates into soluble salts, according to the reaction: CaCO3 + 2NaCl --- CaCl2 + Na2CO3 This water must be treated to remove ions for drinking water.
Well, I learned something new today! I never heard of the Culligan Man or water softeners that need salt to function. The link below explains how they work. The problem with the water is not that it is not clean, but that it is hard which means it has a lot of calcium carbonate in it. This gets deposited in pipes and makes it hard to get a lather from soap and shampoo. The water softener takes the calcium carbonate out of the water using ion exchange beads, and the salt is used to wash the beads periodically. I suspect they use rock salt because it is unprocessed and so it's cheaper than purified salt.
4 steps 1. Grind rock salt 2. Dissolve salt from mixture 3. Filter 4. Evaporate water from filtrate to get pure (ish) salt
Normally you pull in the clutch, and shift down as you brake, so that you are always in a gear that is appropriate for your current speed. Letting the clutch out in each gear is not necessary. It is much easier to control brakes than to control engine braking. The harder you stop, the more braking force is available at the front wheel, and less at the rear. Braking traction is roughly 50--50 at steady speed, gradually transferring to 100% front, 0% rear at maximum braking. Very hard braking on modern sport-bikes can easily lift the rear tire off the ground, resulting in the above 100%--0% condition described above. It is important to brake progressively: As you brake, you get more front-end traction as the tire gets more weight on it, and then you can brake harder, which puts even more weight on it.etc. However, if you just pounce on the front brake, you may be asking for more traction than the tire can provide at that instant, resulting in a front-end slide, which almost always results in a crash. In an emergency situation, it is best to pull in the clutch and concentrate on maximum braking, and to ignore down-shifting until there is time to do it.
i usually just press the brake and downshift as i slow. so i guess i do a combination of engine braking and regular braking. dont know if this is the best but its always worked for me. and yes always use front or both. i had my rear brake rod fall off the peg side on i-95 before and made it home safely with just my front brake.

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