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Question:

IT guy left company. No one has Administrator access (not even owner). How do we change that?

IT guy left company. No one has Administrator access (not even owner). How do we change that?

Answer:

Just pop it into your washing machine. The Maytag front loading ones work great for this purpose. Actually, it depends on what you're cleaning in your VCR. I've been servicing and repairing tape machines since before VCRs, when they were industrial machines in TV stations. They say not to use those dry cassettes because they are abrasive and will damage the video heads. Which is true if you were to do it daily, or even weekly over a period of time. But for the rare occasional use when you get a snowy picture from your tape, there is little damage to the machine. Still, if you have the time and patience, and don't mind opening up the machine to do it, you can use chamois-tipped swabs with 90% isopropyl alcohol, and manually clean the heads. The same caveat applies. Be gentle, you can damage the heads with too much pressure or force. Don't be afraid to use liberal amounts of alcohol. It will loosen any dirt/debris caught in the heads, and the excessive amount will evaporate quickly without leaving a residue. If you're talking about cleaning the pinch rollers and guide path elements, then you need to use lintless cloths like Kimwipes. Industrial electronic supply companies sell specifically formulated liquids for exactly that purpose. They strip a miniscule layer of residue from the rubber pinch rollers so that the dirt doesn't cause the tape to stick, as well as similarly cleaning the tape guide path posts. If you don't want to hunt down, or spend the money, for that cleaning agent, then use the isopropyl (90%) alcohol again. It's nearly as good, and better than nothing. Personally, I think you're easiest and cheapest way is still to use one of those dry tape cleaning cassettes, especially the ones that come with a solution to wet the cleaning tape. And when you run out of that solution, use the isopropl alcohol. (Drug stores sell 91% for 99¢ a pint. Never, ever use the 70% rubbing alcohol; it contains too many contaminants and doesn't evaporate as efficiently.)
No it's normal for little kids to be scared off loud sounds

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