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Question:

if my pipes bust feb9 and the landlord has resolved the problem what do i do?

if my pipes bust feb9 and the landlord has resolved the problem what do i do?

Answer:

They make a tool called a ferrel puller that works great but you can grab the nut with your channel lock pliers and rock it up and down as you are pulling. If that doesn't work you can cut into the brass ferrel with a hacksaw blade just enough to get through the thickest part of the brass and put a flat head screw driver blade into the groove and twist it to snap it open. It should slide right off. Be careful not to cut into the copper or the new one won't seal.
Motorcycle safety is a big factor that begins with the proper clothing. Leathers are the best and today you can find some nice stuff online that will fit the bill. Also riding boots is an excellent idea. The next best jean jackets and pants because no one wants to wear leather all the time. Jeans are the second best option. Cover the skin for protection from the strawberry road rash the best way you can is always recommended. Combat boots are a good idea but most any kind of boot will provide protection. Ridding boots sometimes come with steel toes for added protection. Never ride without protection for your feet and skin. No tennis shoes either. Army Surplus for combat boots you should be able to find online also.
Replace the batteries, even the hard wired units have a battery back up system. Many were at a central location rather than the individual units years ago but those are due to be replaced by now. Change the batteries on a regular basis, like every 6 months. Write the date on the battery with a sharpie.
They do make a ferrel puller to remove the old compression fitting. Is it for a toilet or other supply line where you an angle-stop/supply shut off at? If you don't want to spend money on a puller, which can run about 40 bucks, if you have enough pipe sticking out of the wall, get a tiny tim saw and cut as close as you can behind the shut off. Saw it evenly and all the way through, you don't want to leave it all jagged, try to get a square cut (perfectly round) then you can slip on your new shut-off. If you can, sand the pipe with sand cloth to clean the pipe well and do not use any pipe dope or teflon tape as it will usually void the warranty on your new shut off should it leak and cause damage. Just be careful with cutting the old supply off and make sure you have at least a 1/2 to slide the new shut off on. If you don't have enough meat on the pipe, cut it off and use a 1/2 coupling to solder an extension on the end. Good luck! Oh, and don't tighten the new shut off to tight on to the pipe, because then you will have issues later. By the way, you may want to try screwing off the old shut off, which would leave the nut and ferrel on the pipe and gently but firmly try to pull it off by putting channel locks on the nut and trying to ease it off. That has worked a couple of times for me as a plumber in the field. Just don't jerk it, but try to firmly pull it off. Good Luck!
WHEN you back off the fittings , normally the ferrules become part of the tubing! , you will probally need to replace them, either get more pipe or a coupling depending on length!

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