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Question:

What is the difference between quartz and automatic movement in a watch?

What is the difference between quartz and automatic movement in a watch?

Answer:

(1) Rock crystal is a colorless, clear quartz in distinct crystals. (2) Milky quartz is white and almost opaque. Its whiteness is caused by minute inclusions of fluids in the solid quartz. (3) Smoky quartz is a yellow, brown, or nearly black transparent or semi-transparent variety. Its smoky appearance may be the result of exposure to radiation from radioactive materials in rocks. (4) Rose quartz commonly occurs in large masses without external crystal form. The rose or pink color is caused by small amounts of titanium in the mineral. (5) Amethyst is purple or violet quartz and is often found in distinct crystals. The impurity causing the purplish color is ferric iron. (6) Citrine is yellow transparent quartz. Fibrous crypto-crystalline quartz also occurs in many varieties. A general name for the different varieties is chalcedony: (7) Chalcedony is translucent, has a waxy appearance, and is often found filling or lining rock cavities. (8) Carnelian is red chalcedony. (9) Sard is reddish-brown chalcedony. (10) Chrysoprase is a light green variety of chalcedony. (11) Heliotrope, which is also known as bloodstone, is green with red spots. (12) Agate and onyx are banded forms of chalcedony. Granular crypto-crystalline varieties of quartz include flint, chert, and jasper: (13) Flint is a tough, dark material that can be broken into sharp-edged pieces. (14) Chert is similar to flint but generally has a lighter color. (15) Jasper is a granular crypto-crystalline quartz which is colored red, yellow, or brown from an included iron oxide. Rarest form of quartz = Amethyst is the rarest form of quartz and has the distinction of giving off a beautiful violet or purple color. (link below) Even further, amethyst as blue quartz is the absolute rarest form, defined by its use of a Rayleigh scattering effect to generate its color. (link below)
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