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Question:

Why is the blanket that I crocheted so heavy?

Why is the blanket that I crocheted so heavy?

Answer:

Use a bigger hookWhat that does is make the granny squares larger for the same number of rounds so it takes fewer squares to cover the same areaAlso, it puts space into the stitches-they are looser and trap more airTherefore you have a warmer blanket for the same weight or a lighter weight blanket for the same warmthYou can also use a loftier yarn than Red Heart Super SaverIt's fairly tight yarnAll-wool yarn is loftier for its weight than acrylic yarn, and some acrylics are loftier (Vanna's Choice) than others (Super Saver)Mash a length between your finger and thumbIf it's lofty, it will flatten and then expand when you turn looseRed Heart Super Saver will stay just like it is, indicating little loftDisclaimer: Red Heart Super Saver is not my favorite yarn to useHowever, it comes in tons of colors and gorgeous color blendsIt's easy care-it will survive machine washing and machine drying numerous times and keep right on keeping you warmIn fact, it gets softer with washing and drying, particularly if you use a fabric softener (which sinks right in to the yarn and improves it)The trick I have found to using Red Heart Super Saver is to use stitches that work with the yarn and to use a bigger hook or needle than the ball-band calls forDouble crochet does better than single crochet, for example; loose stitch patterns do better than tight patternsWhat you're doing is adding loft in the stitches to compensate for the lack of loft in the yarnEdited to add: The number of squares you need for a blanket is determined by two things: (1) The size of each finished square, with edging(2) The size you want your blanket100 squares that average 4 in diameter will give you a throw that's 40 x 40-about a meter square-arranged 10 squares across and 10 squares downIf they are 5 in diameter, the throw will be 50 x 50, which is a very large throwMost squares average between 4 and 5 with the edgingFor a baby blanket, you'd want to use a sport-weight (Category 3) yarn.
Around $50I bought storage bins, some food items, cleaning products, a mop that broke after the first use, Christmas decor, and some miscellaneous objectsThe dollar store is such a wonderful place.
I normally spent $5 on the Dollar tree on snacks, like chips and candy.
We have a £1 shop here in the UK, called PoundlandI rarely go in there but when I do, I find myself buying lots of stuff I dont necessarily need so I do try to avoid it.
Use a bigger hookWhat that does is make the granny squares larger for the same number of rounds so it takes fewer squares to cover the same areaAlso, it puts space into the stitches-they are looser and trap more airTherefore you have a warmer blanket for the same weight or a lighter weight blanket for the same warmthYou can also use a loftier yarn than Red Heart Super SaverIt's fairly tight yarnAll-wool yarn is loftier for its weight than acrylic yarn, and some acrylics are loftier (Vanna's Choice) than others (Super Saver)Mash a length between your finger and thumbIf it's lofty, it will flatten and then expand when you turn looseRed Heart Super Saver will stay just like it is, indicating little loftDisclaimer: Red Heart Super Saver is not my favorite yarn to useHowever, it comes in tons of colors and gorgeous color blendsIt's easy care-it will survive machine washing and machine drying numerous times and keep right on keeping you warmIn fact, it gets softer with washing and drying, particularly if you use a fabric softener (which sinks right in to the yarn and improves it)The trick I have found to using Red Heart Super Saver is to use stitches that work with the yarn and to use a bigger hook or needle than the ball-band calls forDouble crochet does better than single crochet, for example; loose stitch patterns do better than tight patternsWhat you're doing is adding loft in the stitches to compensate for the lack of loft in the yarnEdited to add: The number of squares you need for a blanket is determined by two things: (1) The size of each finished square, with edging(2) The size you want your blanket100 squares that average 4 in diameter will give you a throw that's 40 x 40-about a meter square-arranged 10 squares across and 10 squares downIf they are 5 in diameter, the throw will be 50 x 50, which is a very large throwMost squares average between 4 and 5 with the edgingFor a baby blanket, you'd want to use a sport-weight (Category 3) yarn.
Around $50I bought storage bins, some food items, cleaning products, a mop that broke after the first use, Christmas decor, and some miscellaneous objectsThe dollar store is such a wonderful place.
I normally spent $5 on the Dollar tree on snacks, like chips and candy.
We have a £1 shop here in the UK, called PoundlandI rarely go in there but when I do, I find myself buying lots of stuff I dont necessarily need so I do try to avoid it.

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